Author: Elizabeth Wein

Not a High Flyer | Black Dove, White Raven by Elizabeth Wein

Not a High Flyer | Black Dove, White Raven by Elizabeth Wein

The hardest thing for me in connection with the #ShelfLove Challenge is not to buy a book when I’m stressed. I broke in early June. Work was getting me down, none of the free audiobooks from SYNC had grabbed my attention and I needed something to brighten my day one morning as I dreaded going into work. Recalling that Black Dove, White Raven had released, I went ahead and purchased it. This novel fits snuggly in an area of history I don’t know much about it. Set mainly in Ethiopia in the years leading up to World War II, the lack of known historical context on my part, the narrators and the story itself, left me struggling to connect with Black Dove, White Raven the way I connected with Code Name Verity and Rose Under Fire. The history. The history of Ethiopia is fascinating. A nation that just recently abolished slavery was running on its own calendar (which was several years behind our own) took pride in the fact it was the only African nation to never be colonized. Religion runs deep in the hills—literally and figuratively. This is a history not explored in American classrooms. I don’t recall any […]

6 Comments | Join in on the Conversation | Posted on September 21, 2015
Book Review 68: Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein

Book Review 68: Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein

I finally exhausted the handful of SYNC audiobooks I downloaded this summer. While reviewing the books I listened to so far from that event, I kept coming back to Elizabeth Wein’s Code Name Verity. That novel is by far and away the best audiobook I’ve ever listened to and I decided to purchase book two in the series, Rose Under Fire because I was so entranced with the characters Wein created and the tension she was able to convey. Rose Under Fire is no Code Name Verity. While I did find Rose’s plight as a P.O.W. engrossing, it wasn’t nearly as emotional, for me, as Code Name Verity. While the story is told is the same fashion as book one in the series, due to how Wein handles Rose’s disappearance, the reader knows that Rose’s survival has already been determined. As a result, the stakes do not feel as high and it’s just a matter of learning the sequence of events that lead to it. What is unique about Rose Under Fire is the third part of the book. Once it is revealed how Rose survives, her reintegration into a war-torn Europe is gut wrenching and heartbreaking. While I have […]

1 Comment | Join in on the Conversation | Posted on February 9, 2015