Genre: thrillers

The Horde Is Coming For You | Antivirus by Michael Koogler

The Horde Is Coming For You | Antivirus by Michael Koogler

Antivirus by Michael Koogler is a science fiction thriller with a twist of gruesome. It kept my mind engaged and my skin crawling until the end. This novel was a bit outside my normal genres—a bit more on the hardcore science fiction side than I tend to read. There are compelling characters throughout Antivirus, I immediately connected with Jennifer and Jon Sheppard. Their relationship felt real and believable. I understood the conflict they both felt in relation to their careers and their need to make sure the other was happy. And their dog, Dakota, filled out their family, and became a real key player in the unfolding of the plot. I could see him bounding around the house and backyard wrestling with Jon and protecting Jennifer. I actually disagree with the book’s blurb on GoodReads. This book, in my opinion is about Jon and his family. The computer virus, introduced in the Prologue, was a real character to me as well. The level of sophistication of the software and its ability to adapt was amazing. I was reminded of the movie, Her, which showed the tender side of intelligent, adaptable AI. The Horde is the complete flip of that. Imagine […]

5 Comments | Join in on the Conversation | Posted on September 16, 2015
Riding the Stream Again | Prisoner by Dennis W. Green

Riding the Stream Again | Prisoner by Dennis W. Green

Back in 2013, I met Dennis at the local science fiction and fantasy convention. After attending his reading, I purchased his first book Traveler, devoured it and have been shouting my love for the book since my first review here on Second Run Reviews. At last year’s ICON, I was thrilled to learn that Traveler would have sequel, Prisoner and was treated to a preview chapter during a late night author reading. I would doubly thrilled when Dennis offered me an eARC of Prisoner earlier this summer. For those of you who have read Traveler, you are in for another wild ride when you pick up Prisoner. Trav Becker and all his doubles are back at it shifting through parallel realities and trying to save the universe. Prisoner moved at a faster pace than Traveler; gone are the interludes. The reader isn’t “forced” to take a break from the action. You are able to read as fast as your eyes and mind can process the words on the page. While Prisoner‘s plot moves at break neck speed, the writing has a more relaxed feel. Trav is in even more trouble with the FBI looking over his shoulder and the stakes […]

5 Comments | Join in on the Conversation | Posted on August 10, 2015
Book Review 92: Hollow City by Ransom Riggs

Book Review 92: Hollow City by Ransom Riggs

The Miss Peregrine series by Ransom Riggs is one of my favorite series. It combines several things that I am dearly fond of. A compelling historical fiction plot with endearing protagonists and creepy antagonists. The physical book is a beauty to behold and is a good weight (not too heavy and not too light). It’s well constructed with amazingly odd photographs, detailed end papers with a design that repeats itself at chapter and part breaks. Without the dust cover, the book appears to be an old classic with its silver inlaid title and decorations. And when placed side by side with book one is the series, it creates a lovely symmetrical tableau on my bookshelf. The second book in the Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series, Hollow City isn’t nearly as creepy as book one and it has a faster pace. Hollow City picks up right where book one left off and doesn’t let up till the end. Which for some empathetic readers, like myself, can be a tad overwhelming. There is great character development for Emma and Jacob as they grow to know themselves and each other through the perils they face with the other Peculiars. Young love is always […]

6 Comments | Join in on the Conversation | Posted on May 20, 2015
Book Review 77: Silk by Chris Karlsen

Book Review 77: Silk by Chris Karlsen

I love Victorian London—the gritty dirty underbelly where Jack the Ripper still stalks the alleys looking for his next victim. The London where the fog wraps around you and from the corner of your eye you swear you saw a man in a deerstalker hat round the corner ahead of you. This is the London, Chris Karlsen takes readers in Silk. Silk wastes no time jumping in to the action. Within the first 20 pages of the novel, which I read while eating lunch, there is a murder which is quite graphic and the readers are exposed to a killer who is as twisted as Jack. The lust the killer feels after taking his first victim drives the story forward and the dance between the detectives and criminal begins. The main detective, Rudyard Bloodstone, is a likable character combining the best elements of Doyle’s Holmes and Watson. He’s observant of human character and actions, but is a down to earth veteran who doesn’t talk over your head. I found myself rooting for Ruddy and his partner, Archie, in the final pages of the novel as they hone in on capturing the killer. For me, mystery novels are always difficult to […]

10 Comments | Join in on the Conversation | Posted on March 16, 2015